Terminology

A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Acrylic:

 

Aurora Borealis (AB): (also called iris, irid, iridescent or rainbow), refers to the permanent "rainbow" finish which is applied while the bead is hot. An Aurora Borealis finish can totally conceal the original color of the bead and shift reflective colors with movement. These beads blend subtly with other colors and the rainbow effect draws the eye and makes them come forward visually.

Alexandrite: derives its name from the natural gemstone displaying the same color-changing properties. Alexandrite glass is a transparent art glass that has subtle color changes with movement and light, resulting from various heat treatments that are applied during production. Alexandrite typically displays blue in fluorescent light, pink to lavender in incandescent light and vivid lilac in sunshine.

[ See Alexandrite Glass Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Bali Silver: are exquisitely detailed beads handmade in Bali, Indonesia.  The silver content of Bali beads are 92.5%, which qualifies them as being defined as Sterling Silver.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

[ See Bali Silver Beads ]

Bali Style: refers to non-silver base metal beads that are designed to imitate the intricate designs of handmade Bali Silver beads.

 

Baroque: is the jewelry term used to describe an irregular, asymmetrical and/or freeform shaped bead.

 

Beggar Beads: Large, irregular or baroque semi-precious stone beads, often consisting of varieties of agate and/or quartz.

 

Bicone: describes a shape that looks like two 3-dimensional cones with their bases joined together at the widest point.

 

Blue Russians: are hand drawn glass beads that were made in Bohemia than shipped to China where each bead was faceted against a grinding wheel. The faceted blue beads were then shipped to Alaska and down the North American Coast and into the North American "Northwest" during the 1800’s Russian fur trade. They were also traded in Africa. Russian Blues are best known for their numerous and irregular facets, and blue coloring in both transparent and opaque.

Brass:

 

Bronze:

 

 Bugle Bead:  A thin, tubular shaped bead ranging from 2mm to 30mm in length.

[ See Bugle Beads ]

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Ceylon: A pearl like finish on a translucent bead.

 

Charlotte: Manufactured in Czechoslovakia, charlottes are tiny glass seed beads that have been cut and/or faceted on one side which causes them to catch and reflect the light. Often used on their own or incorporated with regular seed beads to add a glint of sparkle to intricate beadwork designs. Charlottes are very similar to Czech Three-Cuts and are often mistaken as being one in the same.

[ See Charlotte Beads ]

Chevron: (also called Rosetta or Star beads) were first produced by glass makers in Venice and Murano Italy towards the end of the 15th century. They are hand made from glass canes containing 4 to 6 layers of alternating colors around a star-shaped core of colored glass. While Italy still produces small quantities of chevron glass beads, they are now also being manufactured in India and China.

[ See Chevron Beads ]

Cloisonné: is a type of enameling where raised designs are created by soldering thin strips of twisted wire onto a metal base. These decorative sections are then filled with powdered glass pigment and fused under high temperatures giving the piece color and a glass like appearance.

[ See Cloisonné Beads ]

Color-Lined: are transparent beads that have a separate, opaque color applied inside the hole. Because the color is within the hole, the finish is more durable than surface applied colors or "painted" beads.  However; pinks, reds and purples have a tendency to fade with prolonged exposure to UV rays and/or too much sunlight.   Color-lined beads stand out subtly when used. The opaque colored center appears surrounded by a halo of light, which is the transparent glass of the bead wall.

Copper: is a natural metal that has been mined for more than 10,000 years and used extensively by both ancient and modern civilizations for decorative and utilitarian purposes.  Pinkish in color when raw, Copper takes on a reddish, orange or brownish color when exposed to oxygen.  Over time, the surface acquires a black oxidization and eventually its characteristic green patina.  When trace elements of Copper are present in other minerals, such as Turquoise and Malachite, it lends to their blue and green coloring. 

Once associated with the goddess Aphrodite and Venus in ancient mythology, Copper is still worn as bracelets today believed by some to be beneficial for relieving joint pain and arthritis. 

Because of Copper’s long and extensive rate of consumption, it is predicted that current reserves may be insufficient to sustain future demand beyond 60 years. Some countries, such as Chili and the United States, still have sizable reserves of the metal which are extracted through large open pit mines. However, because of Copper’s unique ability to remain stable when melting down, much of the Copper on today’s market has been recycled.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

[ See Copper Beads ]

Crow Beads: also called "Roller Beads", are a large-hole glass or plastic bead approximately 8mm to 9mm in size that are typically strung on leather cord and used in traditional Native American Indian craft. Old style crow beads are becoming increasingly hard to find as manufacturers in the Czech Republic are slowly phasing them out and replacing them with modern machine-pressed "Roller Beads" that offer contemporary colors and more uniformity of shape.

[ See Crow Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Dichroic: refers to a glass bead or cabochon that is fused together with a thin metal film giving the finished piece a metallic sheen that reflects changing colors with movement and light.

[ See Dichroic Glass ]

Delica Bead:  Miyuki Delica® beads are small glass beads (size 11/o or 15/o) that where introduced by Japan. Delicas are close in size to seed beads, but are more cylindrical in shape and have very thin walls and large holes for their size. Because of their uniformity, they are perfect for loomwork, peyote stitch and brick stitch; giving the appearance of little tiles when finished.

[ See Delica Beads ]

Drawn Beads: are hand made by allowing a bubble to form in hot molten glass that is attached to the end of a metal tube. The pliable glass is then stretched out very slowly until it forms a stringer in the length and thickness desired. The glass cane is than cut into individual beads (the air bubble becoming the center hole), and the sharp edges of the beads are sanded or polished to produce a finished product. Chevron Beads are typically made using this centuries-old process.  

Druk: also called "druck" is the term used to describe the classic smooth round pressed glass beads manufactured in the Czech Republic.

 

Dyed:  (also referred to as "Painted") is the term used to describe a finish which is achieved by applying surface colorants and/or stains to the finished bead with heat or solvents.  Transparent beads are usually labeled "dyed"; while opaque beads are labeled "painted".  Dyed finishes are similar in durability to galvanized and lined beads, so care should be taken to avoid overexposure to direct sunlight or constant contact with oils and acids from the skin. The dyed beads display much like opaque, greasy and transparent beads, but the colors tend to be brighter and therefore stand out more. However, you may want to consider what your finished product will look like in the event the original color and finish fades with time.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

E-Beads: also called "Rocailles", are glass beads similar to seed beads but slightly larger, approximately 4mm to 5mm in size.

[ See E-Beads ]

 

Enamel: a process by which color is applied to metal using finely powered glass which is then fused under high temperatures.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

Filigree: typically refers to a hollow bead that features an intricate lace-like patterning.

[ See Filigree Beads ]

Fire Polished: is a term used to describe the process by which a finished glass bead is reintroduced to heat so as to smooth, polish and melt away any imperfections. A technique commonly used by bead manufacturers in the Czech Republic.

[ See Firepolished Beads ]

Frosted: is another term used to describe a "Matte" finish.  Frosted beads have a velvety or "frost-like" dull finish, rather than a shiny or reflective surface. The effect is achieved by chemical etching or tumbling.  Frosted beads recede visually next to any shiny bead and display rich deep colors, much like Greasy glass.



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Galvanized: A shiny finish giving the appearance of metal, also referred to as "metallic".   Galvanized finishes are not impervious to acids or constant wear, therefore it is not recommended for items that will spend prolonged periods in contact with skin.

Gemstone Beads: Beads carved from precious and semiprecious stone.  For a more detailed description of our gemstone beads and their mineral properties, please refer to our Gemstone Glossary.

Givre: Comes from the French word meaning "frosted" or "covered in frost." Most of the earliest Givre beads were made in West Germany and consisted of a colored core encased with frosted clear glass. Today, the term "Givre" now applies to any two-tone transparent or translucent glass bead where one color is infused or encased with another.

Gold FilledGold-Filled: is the term used to describe an item that is overlaid with at least 5% total gold weight permanently applied by heat and pressure bonding to a metal alloy base. Although similar to Gold-Plate, the thickness and higher content of gold on the surface layer, as well as the bonding method, makes it more durable and better suited for longer wear than it's lesser expensive alternative.    

Gold-Lined: are transparent colored beads lined with genuine gold plating.  While beautiful, (and often expensive!) metallic and precious metal finishes can be worn away in time by moving threads under too much wear.

Gold PlatedGold-Plate: refers to a process whereby a thin molecule of gold layering is applied by electroplating to a metal alloy or other material base. Although the surface plating is not as durable or permanent as Gold-Filled, and has a tendency to wear off in time, it provides an economical alternative to more expensive precious metals.

Goldtone or Gold Tone: refers to any piece that has no measurable gold content, but has a finish that appears to be gold. Some thinly electroplated jewelry may also be referred to as gold tone, but is more commonly called “gold plated.” In all cases, gold tone or plated jewelry has so little gold that the gold content cannot be measured in karats—any gold or gold color is merely cosmetic. The coating on this type of jewelry often wears thin quickly, causing a loss of color and shine.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

Gooseberry Beads: are vintage hand drawn glass beads made in Venice Italy in the 1800’s to early 1900’s. They are typically transparent clear with delicate white stripes. These rare beads were once traded extensively in North America and West Africa and are becoming increasingly more difficult to find.

Greasy:  Type of glass that is semi opaque or translucent (allows some light to pass through but is not completely transparent).  The surface finish is a dull, smooth semi-gloss which appears greasy, giving the bead more depth to its color.

Guilded:



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Heshi:  Heshi Beads (also spelled Hishi or Heishi) are small disc or tube shaped beads with narrow walls and large holes for stringing. Originating with the native peoples of New Mexico, the term "heishi" means "shell"; once referring to pieces of shell that were drilled, hand rolled or ground into beads and strung on necklaces. Today, heshi beads are created from a variety of materials including stone, shell, wood and metal. Sterling Silver heshi, because of its fluidness when draped together in multiple strands, is often referred to as "liquid silver".

[ See Heshi Beads ]

Hex Beads: are Japanese glass beads similar to Delica Beads, except they have six (6) sides, which creates sparkle when catching the light like other 'cut' glass beads. They are cylindrical in shape, have very thin walls and large holes for their size. Like Delica Beads, they look wonderful in loomwork, peyote stitch and brick stitch, and give the appearance of little tiles when finished.

**While similar, these beads are not as uniform in size as the more expensive 15/0 Miyuki® Delica Beads that have recently come onto the market and may not mix well with them.

        These beads are no longer being produced and are becoming increasingly more difficult to find. Some of the colors and finishes in our bead inventory are from old stock (prior to 1995) and will no longer be available once sold.

[ See Hex Beads ]

Hill Tribe Silver: comes from the remote mountains of Thailand using centuries-old traditional methods.  They contain a higher percentage of silver than Sterling (95% to 99% purity) that makes them much softer than sterling and brighter, but slower to tarnish.  Since each bead is created individually by hand, there will be slight variances in size and shape from one bead to another.  There is also a seam which is the hallmark of handmade or benchmade beads.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

[ See Hill Tribe Silver Beads ]

Hogan: refers to a fluted sterling silver bead, saucer like or bicone in shape, traditionally used in jewelry making by the Navajo and other southwestern tribes.  These old-style beads were typically used as spacers to accent larger beads made of turquoise or coral and are still used today by contemporary Native American jewelry artists.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H 
I   J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

15mm *Vintage* Inside Painted Bird China Lampwork ROUND BeadInside Painted: China has perfected the intricate and time-consuming art of ‘inside painting’. Talented artists train for years to learn this technique which requires precision control of a tiny paintbrush that is slightly bent in order to allow it to pass through the narrow opening of the bead. The artist must then paint in reverse to create the images that are permanently incased within the handmade glass.

Irid: is the short term for "Iridescent" (also called aurora borealis, iris or rainbow). It refers to the permanent "rainbow" finish which is applied while the bead is hot. An Irid finish can totally conceal the original color of the bead and shift reflective colors with movement. These beads blend subtly with other colors and the rainbow effect draws the eye and makes them come forward visually.

Iridescent:  (also called aurora borealis, irid, iris or rainbow), refers to the permanent "rainbow" finish which is applied while the bead is hot. An iridescent finish can totally conceal the original color of the bead and shift reflective colors with movement. These beads blend subtly with other colors and the rainbow effect draws the eye and makes them come forward visually.

Iris:  (also called aurora borealis, irid, iridescent or rainbow), refers to the permanent "rainbow" finish which is applied while the bead is hot. An iris finish can totally conceal the original color of the bead and shift reflective colors with movement. These beads blend subtly with other colors and the rainbow effect draws the eye and makes them come forward visually.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I 
J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Kashmiri: are handmade beads that derive from India.  They are crafted using a Lac resin wrapped around a silver core that is then embellished with stones, beads and wires to create intricate patterns and a uniquely ethnic look.



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K 
L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Lampwork: Lampwork beads are individually created by hand on a metal rod called a "mandrel". Molten glass is wound on the mandrel, then shaped and layered with varying techniques and colors. When the desired form is achieved, they are then put into a kiln to heat all parts evenly and then are annealed (allowed to cool slowly) to reduce the risk of stress fractures in the bead. After the bead is cooled it is carefully removed from the mandrel and ready for use.

   Because of the potential choking hazard of small items and the fragile nature of hand-made glass, lampwork beads are NOT recommended for young children or jewelry items (such a bracelets) that may be more susceptible to rough wear or high impact situations.

[ See Lampwork Beads ]

Lined:  is the term used to refer to a transparent bead that has a color or metallic finish applied to the inside hole.

 

Liquid Gold & Liquid Silver: is the term used to describe fine metal tube beads that are super thin and similar in size and shape to Bugle Beads. They can be either straight or twisted. Liquid Gold and Liquid Silver beads derive their name from the fluidity of movement they create when strung together end-to-end on multiple strands. Most popular and frequently seen in southwest-style jewelry designs.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

Lucite:

Luster:  is a uniform, semi-transparent high gloss coating with a whitish or pearl-like appearance.  Usually permanent. Luster may be white, colored or even gold. "Pearl Luster" is often used to describe opaque lustered beads, while "Ceylon" is used in reference a translucent lustered bead. Luster beads also blend smoothly with other finishes. When used with plain beads, luster beads come forward visually.



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Marbelized: (sometimes referred to as "Picasso") originated with glass bead manufacturers in the Czech Republic. Marbelized beads have an earthy appeal because of the random splattering and mottling of colors usually applied over an opaque base, resembling that of natural stone.

Matte: beads have a velvety or "frosted" dull finish, rather than a shiny or reflective surface. The effect is achieved by chemical etching or tumbling.  Matte beads recede visually next to any shiny bead and display rich deep colors, much like greasy glass.

DB0411: 11/o MIYUKI DELICAS - Metallic GoldMetallic: A shiny finish giving a metal-like appearance.   The finish may be applied as a baked-on paint or electroplated onto nickel iridized beads. Electroplated beads are more permanent than galvanized or baked-on surfaces, although over time the thin gold coating may wear away.  The permanence of non-irid, metallic finishes are always questionable. If unsure, it is better to test a few beads with chlorine bleach, alcohol, or acetone.

Micro Bead:  Prior to 1910, very tiny micro seed beads were manufactured in Venice, Italy. During the "reservation period" of the late 1880's, these tiny beads were used by Native Americans in producing incredibly intricate and beautiful items. Production of this size and style of tiny bead ceased just prior to WW I. There are some modern micro beads being made today, but they are quite different in shape and appearance from the antique seed beads. They are more tube-shaped, almost like Delica or Hex beads. The antique beads are generally more rounded in shape.

[ See Micro Beads ]

Millefiori: typically refers to glass or clay beads with imbedded floral designs. Millefiori means "a thousand flowers" in Italian.

[ See Millefiori Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Nickel: also call "Nickel Silver", is a metal alloy mostly containing nickel, popularized in German and Native American jewelry. Nickel silver resembles Sterling Silver in color, with a slightly greyer tone.  Like silver, the surface has a tendency to oxidize with extended exposure and acquire a dark patina that can be minimized with regular polishing.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

[ See Nickel Beads ]

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Opal:  also referred to as "opalescent", is a translucent bead with a cloudy/milky color or finish that often reflects different colors of light. Good opal glass has a glow to it, like the gemstone is derives its name from. Greasy glass is a actually a dense opal glass without the reflective quality. Visually, opal glass behaves like greasy glass except with more sparkle.

8mm Opaque Chalk White Pressed Glass Smooth ROUND BeadsOpaque:  is a solid color that light does not pass through.  Opaque colors come forward against transparent or translucent beads.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O 
P   Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Painted: (also referred to as "Dyed") is the term used to describe a finish which is achieved by applying surface colorants and/or stains to the finished bead with heat or solvents.  Transparent beads are usually labeled "dyed"; while opaque beads are labeled "painted".  Painted finishes are similar in durability to galvanized and lined beads, so care should be taken to avoid overexposure to direct sunlight or constant contact with oils and acids from the skin. The painted beads display much like opaque, greasy and transparent beads, but the colors tend to be brighter and therefore stand out more. However, you may want to consider what your finished product will look like in the event the original color and finish fades with time.

Palladium:  is a rare and lustrous silvery-white metal that was discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston, and named after the asteroid Pallas, which was named after the epithet of the Greek goddess Athena, acquired by her when she slew Pallas. It has been used as a precious metal in jewelry since 1939, as an alternative to platinum or white gold. This is due to its naturally white properties, giving it no need for rhodium plating. It is slightly whiter, much lighter and about 12% harder than platinum. Similar to gold, palladium can be beaten into a thin leaf form as thin as 100 nm (1/250,000 in). Like platinum, it will develop a hazy patina over time. Unlike platinum, however, palladium may discolor at high soldering temperatures, become brittle with repeated heating and cooling, and react with strong acids.

Palladium is one of the three most popular metals used to make white gold alloys. (Nickel and silver can also be used.) Palladium-gold is a more expensive alloy than nickel-gold, but seldom causes allergic reactions (though certain cross-allergies with nickel may occur).

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

 

Pewter: is a metal alloy that is largely made from tin with trace elements, like copper or antimony added for hardness. Older or classic pewter contains tin while lower grades of pewter may contain lead or zinc and have a darker silver-grey color. Newer or modern pewter uses antimony or bismuth rather than lead.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

[ See Pewter Beads ]

Picasso: (also referred to as "Marbelized") derives its description from its artist namesake, Picasso. Originating with glass bead manufacturers in the Czech Republic, Picasso beads have an earthy appeal because of the random splattering and mottling of colors usually applied over an opaque base.

 

Plated:  refers to a process whereby a thin molecule of precious metal, such as gold or silver, is applied by electroplating to a lesser expensive metal alloy or other material base.

Polymer Polymer clay is a man-made material that is extremely lightweight and durable. In raw form it can be sculpted, carved, textured, painted, made into canes, or mixed with other materials to create unique artisan beads for jewelry. Polymer beads can also withstand temperature changes, wear and breakage more than glass and are a perfect alternative for children’s jewelry or larger focal pieces without the weight that typically accompanies bulkier beads. Finished polymer beads are typically available in matte, buffed or applied gloss finishes.

[ See Polymer Beads ]

Pony Beads: are plastic or glass beads similar to seed beads but much larger, approximately 6mm to 7mm in size with larger holes for stringing on hemp, cord or leather.

[ See Pony Beads ]

Pressed Glass: is a term used to describe a manufactured bead whereby molten glass is poured into metal molds and then pressed into uniform designs and shapes.

[ See Pressed Glass Beads ]

Prosser: refers to the cold cast method originally invented by the Prosser brothers of Bohemia in the 19th century for making buttons. The technique consists of molding a cold paste under great pressure and then firing it. The finished product looks like porcelain and is often referred to as such. By the 1860’s virtually all beads were produced using this machine method. All Prosser beads are opaque in color and have a thin seam.

These beads were introduced into the American west and were used for trading with the American Indians, who then incorporated the beads into their crafts. As trade beads, they are sometimes also known as Prosser trade beads. In African trade, they are known as "kankanmba" or "kancamba."



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q 
R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

DB0088: 11/o MIYUKI DELICAS - Transparent Dark Topaz, Berry Lined, Iridescent (A/B)Rainbow:  (also called aurora borealis, irid, iridescent or iris), refers to the permanent "rainbow" finish which is applied while the bead is hot. A rainbow finish can totally change the original color of the bead and shift reflective colors with movement. These beads blend subtly with other colors and the rainbow effect draws the eye and makes them come forward visually.

Rhodium:  (From the Greek word rhodon meaning "rose") is a hard, silvery, durable metal that was discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston, soon after his discovery of palladium. It has both a higher melting point and lower density than platinum.  Rhodium is most often used in jewelry as electroplating, also called ‘rhodium flashing’, to give it a reflective white surface that is Hypoallergenic and resists tarnishing. Solid (pure) rhodium jewelry is very rare, because the metal has both high melting point and poor malleability (making such jewelry very hard to fabricate) rather than due to its high price.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

 

4mm Transparent Crystal, Silver Lined Czech Glass "E" BEADS (Rocaille)Rocaille: also called "E-Beads", are glass beads similar to seed beads but slightly larger, approximately 4mm to 5mm in size.

[ See Rocaille Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Satin: glass has a striated, layered or satin-like appearance. The apparent color shade of satin glass changes with your viewing angle like the cloth it derives its name from. Satin beads come forward in a design because of their variable reflectivity.

 

Seed Bead: Small, rounded glass beads used for intricate beadwork designs. Sizes range from 9/0 thru 24/0.  The higher the number, the smaller the bead size.

[ See Seed Beads ]

Silver-Lined: have a mirror like silver lining that transmits from the center of a transparent or translucent colored bead. Some silver-lined beads contain squared or faceted holes as a means to enhance the reflective qualities. This form of silver-lined bead is often referred to as a  "rocaille".  While beautiful, metallic and color-lined finishes can be worn away in time by moving threads under too much wear and tear. Silver linings may also tarnish with exposure and age.

Silver-Plated: refers to a process whereby a thin molecule of genuine silver is applied by electroplating to a metal alloy or other material base. Although the surface plating is not as durable or permanent as Sterling or Hill Tribe Silver, and has a tendency to wear off in time, it provides an economical alternative to more expensive precious metals.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

Sterling: (aka: Sterling Silver) refers to items that contain at least 92-1/2% of pure silver and 7-1/2% copper or other metal alloy.  Although Silver will "patina" in time and requires regular  polishing to maintain it's newness, many  prefer the "antiqued" or vintage character it acquires over time.  Particularly as it pertains to more intricately designed pieces whereby small details become more visible between the raised and recessed patterns and textures.

All metal components, beads, jewelry and findings are packaged in zip-lock bags with anti-tarnish strips.  However, there is no guarantee that items will not oxidize after prolonged storage and may require some cleaning and/or polishing to restore the original luster before use.    

  [ See Sterling Silver Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Three-Cuts: are very similar to the traditional Czechoslovakian charlotte bead, except that they contain three cuts and/or facets instead of one.  The facets on these tiny beads are what makes them sparkle under the light, giving them their distinct beauty.

[ See Three-Cut Beads ]

Tibetan Silver: is a market term used to describe a metal alloy primarily used in jewelry components. It is similar to pewter - an alloy of copper, and sometimes tin or nickel, with a small percentage of pure silver. Its overall appearance is of aged silver, but it can be polished to provide highlights on complex castings.

Tigereye: like its gemstone namesake, tigereye glass has an opaque base with swirls of amber, brown and black running through it. Its warm, earthy appearance very closely resembles the natural gemstone it was named after.

Tortoise: like its namesake, tortoise shell glass has a transparent to translucent base with the mottled or swirled colors of amber, black or brown running through it. It's warm, earthy appearance closely resembles that of natural horn or shell.

Translucent: describes a semi-transparent bead, whereby one can see light through the bead, although the light is diffused. Translucent beads are sometimes referred to as “Greasy Glass”, although Greasy Glass more accurately describes a translucent bead with a smooth dull polish, or semi-gloss finish.

Transparent: means that you can see completely through the bead.  Transparent actually 'transmits' or gives off light, making them a little more sparkly than opaque or translucent beads, but they tend to recede visually in the background against other colors.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Vermeil: A product containing a Sterling Silver base over which a surface of gold (at least 10K fine and at least 2.5 microns thick) has been applied by either fire-gilding or electroplating.

6mm Transparent Ruby Red A/B Vitrail Pressed Glass HEART BeadsVitrail: Refers to an iridescent coating or finish that is applied to only one part or one side of a bead.

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

White Heart:  (also referred to as Cornaline D' Aleppo or Hudson Bay Beads) is a two-layer bead with an inner core of white glass under a second layer of translucent color. Vintage or antique white hearts were originally traded in the fur era around 1800's are highly sought after by collectors. Rare original colors included dark reds and true lavenders and purples. Contemporary colors still being produced by the French, Czech and in India today are rose, bright red, blue and turquoise.

[ See White Heart Beads ]



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 



A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Zinc: